House Committee Launches Data Security and Electronic Privacy Review

In the wake of recent high-profile data breaches suffered by major companies that exposed over 100 million customer records to identity theft, the House Energy and Commerce Committee announced plans to conduct a sweeping review of the data security and privacy issues affecting American consumers and businesses. The Committee will divide the review into two phases by first surveying current security measures used to protect personal information online before turning to bolstering privacy protections for Internet users. Committee Chairman Rep. Fred Upton (R-MI) noted that the recent rise in cyber attacks seeking access to personal data necessitates a reassessment of the security standards used by companies that collect customer information. Communications and Technology Subcommittee Chairman Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR) echoed Sen. Upton’s concerns and stated that the review aims to produce policies which will strike a balance between protecting consumer information and maintaining innovation.

The Committee’s review will likely serve as a launching point to evaluate existing cybersecurity proposals and develop new data protection legislation. In April, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) and Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) introduced the “Commercial Privacy Bill of Rights Act” to establish federal consumer privacy protections that would apply across industry sectors and level stiff civil penalties against companies that mishandle or lose customer information. To protect the privacy of young social media users, Rep. Joe Barton (R-TX) and Ed Markey (D-MA) proposed the “Do Not Track Kids Act,” which would establish a “Digital Marketing Bill of Rights for Teens,” require companies to erase personal information upon request, and prohibit the storage of user geolocation data. The storage of geolocation data garnered recent media attention following reports that Apple’s iPod and iPad operating systems tracked user movements through a software “bug” which the company later removed. States such as California have also attempted to force social media providers to afford customers more control over their online privacy settings, facing staunch opposition from many major Internet companies.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

Senators McCain and Kerry Introduce Privacy Bill of Rights

On April 12, 2011, Senator John Kerry (D-MA) and Senator John McCain (R-AZ) introduced the “Commercial Privacy Bill of Rights Act of 2011” to establish the first federal statutory baseline of consumer privacy protection that would apply across industry sectors. The bill would govern how customer information is used, stored, and distributed online. We will provide more analysis soon, but for now, here are the highlights:

Information covered. The bill applies to broad categories of information, including names, addresses, phone numbers, e-mail addresses, other unique identifiers, and biometric data when any of those categories are combined with a date of birth, place of birth, birth certificate number, location data, unique identifier information (that does not, alone, identify an individual), information about an individual’s use of voice services, or any other information that could be used to identify the individual.

Right to security and accountability. Information-collecting entities would be required to implement security measures to protect user information and would be prohibited from collecting more individual information than is necessary “to enforce a transaction or deliver a service requested by that individual,” subject to certain exceptions.

Privacy by design. Entities would be required to implement privacy by design concepts, which would require entities to incorporate privacy protection into each stage of product or service development in a manner that is much more comprehensive than previously required anywhere in the United States.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

U.S. Justice Department Raises Concerns Regarding Proposal to Limit Federal Government's Access to 'Cloud' Data

By Oded Green

On April 6, 2011, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing regarding a proposed update to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) in light of cloud computing and other technological developments that have occurred since the statute was enacted more than two decades ago. The ECPA is comprised of three laws -- the Wiretap Act, the Stored Communications Act, and the Pen Register Act -- which govern when certain parties, including law enforcement and other governmental authorities, may access communications and related data and to whom they may disclose those communications and data.

According to Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman, Patrick Leahy, with the explosion of cloud computing, social networking sites and other new technologies, determining how to bring ECPA into the digital age is one of Congress’ greatest challenges. He added that ECPA is “hampered by conflicting standards that cause confusion for law enforcement, businesses and consumers." For example, the content of a single e-mail could be subject to as many as four different levels of privacy protections under ECPA, depending on where it is stored, and when it is sent.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

House Votes to Overturn FCC's Net Neutrality Order

In a setback to one of the FCC’s key policy proposals, the House of Representative today voted in favor of a Resolution of Disapproval under the Congressional Review Act aimed at invalidating the Commission’s Net Neutrality Order adopted late last year. The vote follows months of heated industry and Congressional debate, including sharply partisan debate  about the Resolution’s merits, court challenges brought by wireless carriers, and procedural delays in bringing the Resolution to the House floor. While the Resolution seeks to overturn the FCC’s new anti-blocking, network management transparency, and traffic discrimination rules, it faces an uphill battle to become law. The Resolution would need to get passed by the Democrat-controlled Senate and get signed by the President. The White House recently said it plans to veto any measure overturning the FCC's Net Neutrality Order.

Tweet Like Email

House E&C Committee Schedules Markup of Resolution to Reject FCC's Net Neutrality

Yesterday the Communications and Technology Subcommittee of the House Energy and Commerce adopted a disapproval resolution (H.J. Res. 37) of the FCC's 2010 Net Neutrality Order by a party-line vote. Today, the Energy and Commerce Committee issued a markup notice for the disapproval resolution of Monday, March 14 at 3:00 p.m. Assuming it is approved that same day (a likely outcome), it could be ready for House floor action fairly quickly (depending on the legislative priorities of the House majority leadership). 

Tweet Like Email

Will Broadcasters Have Incentive to Contribute Spectrum for Wireless Broadband?

By Marc S. Martin and Martin L. Stern

With demand for wireless Internet access predicted to increase exponentially over the next few years, the debate over the FCC’s proposal to free up large amounts of broadcast spectrum through “incentive” auctions pits television broadcasters against other industry sectors and the Administration in a heated regulatory and legislative battle over the future of broadcast television and mobile broadband.

Under the National Broadband Plan, the FCC set a goal of redeploying 500 MHz of spectrum for mobile broadband use by 2020, recommending that 120 MHz come from the broadcast television bands. The Commission’s National Broadband staff set their sights on television broadcasters after concluding that much of the 6 MHz currently allocated to television stations remains underutilized following completion of the digital transmission transition in  2009, with only 15% percent of U.S. households reliant on over-the-air transmission for their reception of television programming. Additionally, estimates place the value of wireless spectrum at $1.28 per MHz per person, compared to 11 to 15 cents per MHz for television spectrum. In response to this value gap, FCC officials propose that television broadcasters participate in voluntary auctions of some or all of their spectrum, with broadcasters receiving a portion of the proceeds as an incentive to vacate their spectrum. The thought is that some broadcasters may welcome the prospect of trading in their spectrum for cash. As part of this proposal, the FCC would also oversee the “repacking” of the spectrum, moving broadcasters (potentially including those who chose not to give up their spectrum) to fewer adjacent channels and potentially placing two or more broadcasters on a single 6 MHz channel. The theory is that the repacking process would free-up significant swaths of broadcast spectrum for wireless broadband use by the winning bidders. The Obama Administration hopes the auction and reallocation processes will mark the first step towards fulfilling the President’s recent pledge to extend high-speed wireless access to 98% of Americans, while putting billions in auction revenue in the public coffers.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

Net Neutrality Supporters Delay House Subcommittee Vote to Reverse FCC Rules [UPDATED: 3/7/11]

In response to a request by House Democratic supporters of the Federal Communications Commission's Open Internet (or Net Neutrality) order, the House Energy and Commerce Subcommitee on Communications and Technology has postponed its vote, scheduled for this morning, on the resolution to reverse the FCC order.  Although no new date has been announced, we understand that a hearing will likely be scheduled for next week.

Yesterday, Energy and Commerce Committee ranking member Henry Waxman (D-CA) and Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-CA), the ranking member on the Communications and Technology Subcommittee, wrote to Communications and Technology Subcommittee Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR) urging him to first hold hearings on the proposed resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act in which supporters of the FCC's order could be heard before having the vote.  Note that even if the House approves the resolution of disapproval, it must still pass the Senate and survive a presidential veto to successfully reverse the FCC's order.

UPDATE: A hearing has been scheduled for March 9, at 10:30 a.m. in 2123 Rayburn House Office Building.

SECOND UPDATE (3/7/11): Representatives Waxman and Eshoo sent a letter on behalf of a group of net neutrality supporters in the House asking Chairman Walden and Rep. Fred Upton (R-MI), Chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, to allow lawmakers to offer amendments to the resolution of disapproval. The Democrats requested the Chairmen bring the disapproval measure as a regular House Resolution instead of under the Congressional Review Act.

Tweet Like Email

The Comcast/NBCU Merger Conditions: Hedges Against an Uncertain Future

On January 18, 2011, the Federal Communications Commission granted its approval to the acquisition by Comcast, the nation's largest cable service operator and cable modem Internet access provider, of NBC Universal, Inc. (NBCU), the owner of the broadcast television network, several cable networks, Internet websites, and a leading Hollywood studio. The merger should fundamentally affect the businesses of programming, production and distribution across many platforms, including broadcast television, cable, online, and film. With significant control over both content and its distribution, the Comcast/NBCU merger created a potential incentive for the combined firm to raise prices and limit access to its programming to the disadvantage of its broadcast and online rivals. Working in coordination with the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division, the FCC imposed a number of “targeted” conditions aimed at ameliorating the merger’s potential harms and quashing impending antitrust suits from states such as California. The Commission highlighted four key conditions to the government’s approval:

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

The FCC's Net Neutrality Order: Substance and Status for Mobile Wireless Broadband

On December 21, 2010, a divided Federal Communications Commission adopted its long-awaited, but highly controversial, Preserving the Open Internet order (“Order”), which requires broadband service providers to treat all web traffic equally and protect open access to the Internet for web consumers and other stakeholders. While Congressional and industry opposition continues to ferment, a closer look at the Order reveals that mobile wireless broadband providers will retain considerable flexibility in how they manage their networks when compared to their fixed provider counterparts. 

The Order focused on three primary goals underpinning the Commission’s net neutrality policy: 1) transparency 2) no blocking and 3) no unreasonable discrimination. For “transparency,” both fixed and mobile providers must publicly disclose the network management practices, performance, and commercial terms of their broadband services. By contrast, the application of the “no blocking” condition differs depending on the type of provider. Fixed providers are subject to a broad obligation to not block lawful content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices. Mobile wireless providers are subject to a narrower obligation to not block lawful websites and applications that compete with the provider’s voice or video telephony services. Most importantly, the Order’s “no unreasonable discrimination” provision applies solely to fixed providers, leaving mobile operators free to favor or disfavor certain types of network traffic. According to the Commission, these new rules for mobile wireless providers will not harm customers because most consumers have more choices for mobile wireless service than for fixed broadband. The Commission also noted favorably the mobile industry’s recent moves towards openness, including the introduction of open operating systems like Android. As a result, when the rules finally go into effect, mobile wireless broadband providers will be exempt from the obligation to manage network traffic in a nondiscriminatory manner.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

K&L Gates Global Government Solutions Report Includes Articles on Key TMT, Privacy and Patent Developments

K&L Gates recently published its Global Government Solutions 2011 Annual Outlook, which contains articles from around the firm on key governmental developments expected in 2011.

The Annual Outlook includes an article addressing developments affecting the Telecom, Media and Technology sector in 2011 by DC partners Marc Martin and Marty Stern, noting that the TMT sector enters 2011 with significant regulatory uncertainty and the FCC facing an uphill battle on many signature regulatory initiatives.

The article reviews the FCC’s net neutrality order and the challenges it faces in court and on Capitol Hill, discusses the recent FCC and Department of Justice approvals of the Comcast/NBCU transaction, and a number of additional issues getting significant focus in 2011. These include retransmission consent battles between broadcasters and cable/DBS providers and the FCC’s expected rulemaking proceeding on this issue, the Commission’s implementation of new communications accessibility requirements under the new 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act, and continued efforts to reform the Universal Service Fund and make it broadband-centric.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

CALEA II - Bigger and Badder?

Recent leaks to the New York Times, as reported in September and October, indicate that the Obama administration will next year be pushing for sweeping expansions of the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA).  CALEA facilitates government surveillance by, among other things, requiring companies subject to the law both to design their systems so that the government can easily plug in and intercept communications in real-time and to provide assistance to the government in these efforts. 

 

A task force comprised of representatives from DOJ, Commerce, the FBI, and other agencies, are discussing amendments to the law.  These changes would greatly expand the reach of CALEA, would significantly increase the costs of non-compliance for covered companies, and would include other requirements which may fundamentally change business models for companies promising encryption and decentralized communication services.    

 

 

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

Broadband in America: The Year in Review; What Lies Ahead

K&L Gates co-hosted a live webcast December 22, carried live on Internet TV channels Broadband US TV and National League of Cities TV.

You can access the free webcast by clicking here (free registration is required).

K&L Gates partner Marty Stern joined co-host Jim Baller, together with guests Cecilia Kang, Communications Industry Journalist, the Washington PostGigi Sohn, President, Public Knowledge,  Jeffrey Silva, Senior Policy Director, TMT, Medley Global Advisors, and  Scott Cleland, President, the Precursor Group, for a lively and provocative review of 2010, particularly of the day-old FCC net neutrality decision, and for some bold predictions for 2011.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

New Disability Access Requirements for Advanced Communications and Video

By Marty Stern (Washington, DC), Carol Lumpkin (Miami) and Stephanie N. Moot (Miami).

The President signed the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 on October 8, 2010 (the “ComVid Accessibility Act” or “Act”). The ComVid Accessibility Act expands various disability access requirements to VoIP phones, browser-enabled smart phones, text messaging, Internet-enabled video devices, on-line video of TV programming, TV navigation devices, and programming guides and menus, among other things. 

Karen Peltz Strauss, who has the lead at the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC” or “Commission”) on implementing the ComVid Accessibility Act, appeared on a recent live program on Internet TV channel Broadband US TV and discussed the FCC's "enormous mandate" to implement the new Act.  Click here for a clip of Ms. Peltz Strauss' comments on the program.  (with permission from TV Worldwide).[1]  According to Ms. Peltz Strauss, “Every segment of the industry that has anything to do with broadband, television, including cable, satellite or broadcast, Internet-based television, as well as . . . Internet-based providers, traditionally regulated [telephone] companies, wireless companies” needs to be paying attention to the new Act.   “Virtually every segment that has anything to do with communications or video programming is covered.” 

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

Symposium on Broadband Reclassification and Net Neutrality What's at Stake? What's the End Game?

On Thursday, December 2nd, K&L Gates hosted a program on net neutrality and the potential regulatory reclassification of broadband Internet access presented by the ABA Antitrust Section's Communications & Digitial Technology Industries Committee. The program, moderated by Washington, DC partner Marty Stern, included:

  • Parul Desai, Policy Counsel, Consumers Union
  • Neil Fried, Minority Chief Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee, Subcommitee on Communications, Technology and the Internet
  • Glenn Manishin, Partner, Duane Morris
  • Lee Selwyn, President, Economics and Technology, Inc.

Audio Archive of event now available (American Bar Association members only) 

Several of the speakers were also authors of articles in the Fall 2010 Broadband Reclassification and Net Neutrality Symposium issue of the Committee's Icarus newsletter.  An article providing an overview of the issue by K&L Gates' partners Marty Stern and Marc Martin, and associate Peter Denton, is available here.  (Posted with permission.)

Tweet Like Email

Community Broadband - A Blessing or Curse?

A Program of Broadband US TV , TV Mainstream and National League of Cities TV.

K&L Gates co-hosted a special live Hall webcast on Thursday, July 29, that was carried live on Internet TV channels Broadband US TV, TV Mainstream and National League of Cities TV.

To access the recording, please click here (free registration is required in order to access the recording).

The Honorable Rick Boucher, Member of the U.S. House of Representatives for the 9th District of Virginia and Chairman of the House Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet, joined Broadband US TV to discuss the community broadband issue, including prospects for enactment of the federal Community Broadband Act. The program, hosted by Marty Stern of K&L Gates and Jim Baller, also included a panel of experts who faced off in a lively, spirited debate on the pros and cons of community broadband, examples of successes and failures, and the political, legal, economic, technological, and social issues posed by community broadband.

Tweet Like Email

Live Webcast: Community Broadband - A Blessing or Curse?

K&L Gates co-hosted a live webcast July 29, carried live on Internet TV channels Broadband US TV and National League of Cities TV.

You can access this free webcast by clicking here (registration is required).

The Honorable Rick Boucher, Member of the U.S. House of Representatives for the 9th District of Virginia and Chairman of the House Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet, joined Broadband US TV to discuss the community broadband issue, including prospects for enactment of the federal Community Broadband Act. The program, hosted by Marty Stern of K&L Gates and Jim Baller, also included a panel of experts who debated the pros and cons of community broadband, examples of successes and failures, and the political, legal, economic, technological, and social issues posed by community broadband.

Tweet Like Email

FCC Seeks Comment on its "Third Way" Approach to Regulating Broadband Internet Service

by Marc S. Martin, Martin L. Stern, Peter W. Denton

On June 17, 2010, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (“FCC” or the “Commission”) adopted a Notice of Inquiry (the “NOI”) seeking comment on the Commission’s consideration of the appropriate legal framework for broadband Internet service, and in particular the “Internet connectivity component” of that service.[1]   Comments on the NOI are due by July 15, 2010, with Reply Comments due by August 12, 2010.

The NOI is the latest step in a contentious debate between the Commission and broadband Internet access providers (e.g., cable, telco and wireless broadband providers) over the Commission’s legal authority to regulate broadband Internet service.  As discussed in our previous alerts, on April 6, 2010, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia overturned an FCC enforcement action against Comcast Corporation arising from allegations that Comcast engaged in unreasonable and discriminatory broadband management practices.[2]   The Commission had previously classified Comcast’s cable modem broadband Internet service as a largely unregulated “information service” under Title I of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended (the “Communications Act”), but asserted indirect “ancillary” authority to enforce certain net neutrality guidelines against broadband Internet access providers.  The court in Comcast ruled that the Commission, based on its prior decision classifying cable modem service as an unregulated information service, lacked direct statutory authority to regulate broadband Internet service, and therefore could not rely on its ancillary jurisdiction to do so.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

The Net Neutrality/Open Internet Debate: What's Next, What's the End Game?

K&L Gates co-hosted a special live Hall webcast on Thursday, May 27, that was carried live on Internet TV channels Broadband US TV, TV Mainstream and National League of Cities TV.

To access the recording, please click here (free registration is required in order to access the recording).

Austin Schlick, General Counsel of the FCC, joined BroadbandUS TV hosts Marty Stern of K&L Gates and Jim Baller to discuss the FCC's case for reclassification of broadband Internet access as a regulated telecommunications service. Julius Knapp, Chief of the FCC's Office of Engineering and Technology, who's heading up the FCC Technical Advisory Panel on the open Internet, also joined to discuss technical issues surrounding the open Internet debate.

The program includes two panels of experts who face-off in lively, spirited debate on the political and legal considerations surrounding net neutrality, and the economic/technical case for new net neutrality rules.

Tweet Like Email

Live Webcast: The Net Neutrality/Open Internet Debate: What's Next, What's the End Game?

K&L Gates co-hosted a special live webcast May 27, from 1:00 - 2:30 pm ET, being carried live on Internet TV channels Broadband US TV, TV Mainstream and National League of Cities TV.

You can access this free webcast by clicking here (registration is required).

Austin Schlick, General Counsel of the FCC, joined BroadbandUS TV hosts Marty Stern of K&L Gates and Jim Baller to discuss the FCC's case for reclassification of broadband Internet access as a regulated telecommunications service. Julius Knapp, Chief of the FCC's Office of Engineering and Technology, who's heading up the FCC Technical Advisory Panel on the open Internet, also joined us to discuss technical issues surrounding the open Internet debate.

The program included two panels of experts who faced-off in lively, spirited debate on the political and legal considerations surrounding net neutrality, and the economic/technical case for new net neutrality rules.

 

Tweet Like Email

"The Third Way": FCC Proposes New Regulatory Powers Over Broadband Internet Access Services

by Marc S. Martin, Martin L. Stern, Peter W. Denton

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (the "FCC") recently charted a new legal course to restore its jurisdictional authority to regulate broadband Internet access services, in response to a sharp rebuke from a federal appeals court over the FCC's previous legal theories.

In a move widely covered by the media, seemingly because debate over its enactment mirrors other ideological conflicts over the proper role of government as mid-term elections approach, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski proposed "reclassifying" the transmission component of broadband Internet access services under the regulatory framework established by the Communications Act of 1934 (the "Act") from a deregulated "information service" under Title I of the Act to a regulated "telecommunications service" under Title II. Rather than subjecting broadband Internet access services to the full panoply of Title II regulatory requirements, however, Chairman Genachowski has proposed a “Third Way,” whereby the FCC would only impose the Title II requirements it deems necessary to implement its targeted policy prescriptions, while forbearing from applying the majority of the Title II provisions.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

Privacy Implications of the FCC's National Broadband Plan

by Marc S. Martin, Martin L. Stern, Peter W. Denton

As we discussed in our recent client alert, the National Broadband Plan (the "Broadband Plan") of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission ("FCC")[1] contains an ambitious set of some 200 recommendations for regulatory and legislative actions to improve the innovation, access, and affordability of broadband Internet service.[2] Tucked among "big-ticket" items that have received much attention in recent weeks – such as reallocation of wireless spectrum and reform of the FCC's Universal Service Fund – are a number of less-heralded suggestions relating to privacy issues and the management of personal data. The implementation of these privacy-related Broadband Plan recommendations by Congress, the FCC, and the Federal Trade Commission ("FTC") could affect a wide range of firms, including broadband Internet access Internet service providers, advertisers, online content providers, and indeed any business with an Internet presence. The purpose of this alert is to provide greater focus and detail on the Broadband Plan's recommendations for privacy regulation.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

Court Overturns FCC's Net Neutrality-Based Decision Against Comcast: What Happens Next?

by Marc S. Martin, Martin L. Stern

On April 6, 2010, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (the “D.C. Circuit”) overturned a 2008 enforcement action by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) against Comcast Corporation arising from allegations of Comcast engaging in unreasonable and discriminatory broadband network management practices.  This client alert will briefly summarize the court decision, discuss how it will affect the FCC’s efforts to adopt net neutrality rules and implement its recently adopted National Broadband Plan (the “Broadband Plan”),[1] address the potential for Congressional intervention, and explain how other federal and possibly state authorities could step in to fill the apparent void in FCC jurisdiction.

The FCC enforcement action arose from complaints about Comcast’s network management practices, which alleged that Comcast deliberately slowed its subscribers’ use of an online peer-to-peer based file sharing service, BitTorrent, because it presented a competitive threat to Comcast’s own broadband service offerings.  The FCC agreed that Comcast’s network management practices in dispute were inconsistent with the FCC’s Internet Policy Statement that, among other things, supported nondiscriminatory access to Internet-based software applications and services.

At the D.C. Circuit, Comcast made a three-pronged attack against the FCC’s enforcement action, asserting:

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

The FCC's Sweeping National Broadband Plan: How it Will Affect You

by Marc S. Martin, Martin L. Stern, Peter W. Denton. March 22, 2010

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission ("FCC") released its congressionally mandated National Broadband Plan on March 16, 2010 (the "Plan"),[1] an ambitious roadmap to meet the goals of improving the innovation, access and affordability of broadband Internet services for approximately 100 million Americans at speeds of at least 100 megabits per second and actual upload speeds of at least 50 megabits per second. Beyond these goals, the Plan also lays out a series of broadband-related goals and recommendations that cut across the nation's economy, addressing such disparate topics as health care, energy utility and transportation infrastructure, education, green energy, a nationwide, interoperable public safety broadband network, ultra-high speed military broadband networks, and greater governmental transparency. A centerpiece policy initiative of the FCC and its new Chairman, and in places a decidedly controversial document, the Plan is the largest undertaking of the FCC, including the contemplated Executive Branch and legislative activity, since the Telecommunications Act of 1996.

While the Plan itself largely focuses on the broad goal of greater access to broadband for consumers and public institutions, the targets set forth in the Plan will require a wholesale reshaping of the regulatory landscape for a diverse set of telecommunications, media, technology, and broader business interests, all of which should closely follow the Plan's implementation.

Continue Reading...
Tweet Like Email

Live Webcast: Broadband Stimulus National Town Hall Meeting

A Program of National League of Cities TV & Broadband US TV

K&L Gates co-hosted a special Broadband Stimulus National Town Hall webcast on February 12. To see the webcast from this free event (registration is required) click here.

The second round Notices of Funds Availability (NOFA) for broadband stimulus funds have just been released, with over $4 billion of funding available in the final round. Time is of the essence, with applications due no later than March 15.

To help educate applicants, National League of Cities TV in cooperation with a newly-launched Internet TV channel, Broadband US TV, featured a free live webcast of the Broadband Stimulus Town Hall Workshop. The interactive live workshop  examine what's changed from the first round and what applicants need to know in putting together successful broadband grant and loan applications.

Jessica Zufolo, RUS Deputy Administrator, and Angela Simpson, NTIA BTOP Senior Advisor, joined hosts Marty Stern of K&L Gates and Jim Baller to discuss the most important lessons that RUS and NTIA learned from Round One, what the agencies hope to achieve in Round Two, and what steps applicants should take to enhance their chances of success in the final round.

The program also included a panel of representative first round winners and a panel of broadband stimulus experts, who took questions from the live online audience and provided further insights into strategies that won or lost in Round One, and new approaches that can take maximum advantage of the new Round Two rules.

Tweet Like Email

National League of Cities TV (NLCTV) Broadband Stimulus National Town Hall Meeting

K&L Gates co-hosted a special live Broadband Stimulus National Town Hall webcast on Friday, February 12, that was carried live on Internet TV channels National League of Cities TV and TV Mainstream, and produced in association with TV Worldwide and BroadbandCensus.com.

To access the recording, please click here (free registration is required in order to access the recording).

The second round Notices of Funds Availability (NOFA) for broadband stimulus funds were released, with over $4 billion of funding available in the final round. To help educate applicants, National League of Cities TV in cooperation with a newly-launched Internet TV channel, Broadband US TV, featured a free live webcast of the Broadband Stimulus Town Hall Workshop. The interactive live workshop examined what's changed from the first round and what applicants need to know in putting together successful broadband grant and loan applications.

Jessica Zufolo, RUS Deputy Administrator, and Angela Simpson, NTIA BTOP Senior Advisor, joined hosts Marty Stern of K&L Gates and Jim Baller to discuss the most important lessons that RUS and NTIA learned from Round One, what the agencies hope to achieve in Round Two, and what steps applicants should take to enhance their chances of success in the final round. The program also included a panel of representative first round winners and a panel of broadband stimulus experts, who took questions from the live online audience and provided further insights into strategies that won or lost in Round One, and new approaches that can take maximum advantage of the new Round Two rules.

Tweet Like Email